Arts and Humanities

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Professor John P Miller | The Importance of Compassion and Compromise in Healthy Societies

Professor John P Miller | The Importance of Compassion and Compromise in Healthy Societies

In a recent paper, Professor John P Miller discusses the importance of mutual accommodation and compassion in preserving democracies and ensuring we can tackle some of our biggest global problems. He highlights the way in which Canada has become a more tolerant, cooperative, inclusive society by emphasising the role of compromise and compassion. Using examples from education, he shows how we can nurture these qualities in children and young adults.

read more
Dr Hong Lu | Exploring the Impact of the Death Penalty on a Convict’s Family

Dr Hong Lu | Exploring the Impact of the Death Penalty on a Convict’s Family

So far, very few research studies have investigated the effects of criminal convictions on the families of defendants. Dr Hong Lu, a Professor of Criminal Justice at University of Nevada, along with her co-authors, Dr Yudu Li and Dr Bin Liang, carried out a study examining how the family of Nian Bin, the defendant in a high-profile capital case in China who received four death sentences, managed the physical, emotional, financial, and legal challenges they faced after their relative’s conviction.

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Dr Megan Schraedley | Reducing Political Sectarianism to Introduce Important Legislation

Dr Megan Schraedley | Reducing Political Sectarianism to Introduce Important Legislation

In the United States, public opinions have become increasingly polarised. This polarisation leads to ‘othering’, which describes how one group of people can view another group as very different from themselves and depict them in negative ways. Dr Megan Schraedley at West Chester University recently carried out a study exploring how othering arises in the context of US politics, and how it can be disrupted. Understanding how this destructive phenomenon can be disrupted could help policymakers to successfully introduce important legislation.

read more
Dr Robert L. Walsh | Propaganda and Mass Deception Depend Upon the Tribal Mind

Dr Robert L. Walsh | Propaganda and Mass Deception Depend Upon the Tribal Mind

Propaganda is the systemic use of language with the intent to brainwash rather than to persuade. It has the subtle but pervasive power to ensnare an entire populace toward a predetermined attitude or outlook. Deceptive communication is now commonplace in this information age. Dr Robert L. Walsh recently examined how propagandists bend language for mass deception. He argued that what makes propaganda so insidious is a vestige of our prehistoric past – the Neolithic or Tribal mind.

read more
Dr Andrea Binsfeld | Exploring Narratives of Slavery in Ancient Novels and Political Texts

Dr Andrea Binsfeld | Exploring Narratives of Slavery in Ancient Novels and Political Texts

The perspectives and characteristics of specific historical periods are often reflected in the literary texts produced and circulated at the time. Dr Andrea Binsfeld, an Associate Professor at University of Luxembourg, has conducted several studies examining narratives of slavery in ancient texts, including novels and political discourses. Her analyses outline, from a different perspective, the deep impact that the institution of slavery had in Greek and Roman societies.

read more
Dr Jens Allwood | Exploring the Dark, Dystopic Side of Digitalisation

Dr Jens Allwood | Exploring the Dark, Dystopic Side of Digitalisation

Over recent decades, the use of digital technologies has increased exponentially worldwide, bringing significant changes to daily life. Like most societal transformations, this process of ‘digitalisation’ has had both positive and negative aspects. Dr Jens Allwood, Professor Emeritus at the University of Gothenburg, has recently published a paper exploring some of the darker elements of digitalisation, particularly focusing on its tendency to dehumanise our daily activities.

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Professor John Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

Professor John Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

The term literature refers to a wide and diverse range of work, including novels, poems, plays, and essays. While literary experts agree that all literature is composed of language, they often argue about which texts can or should be considered as a part of the literature that we value. In recent years, technological advances have led to the creation of innovative works that merge language with digital media, state-of-the-art technologies and computation itself. In a fascinating book called Grammalepsy, Professor John Cayley of Brown University introduces a new theory of aesthetic linguistic practice that could shed new light on digital literature or, more comprehensively, language art.

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Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

Rises in population and demographic changes can have significant effects on the development and governance of urban environments. Associate Professor Glen Searle of the University of Sydney recently published a paper that highlights the ways in which Sydney’s rapid population growth is supported by national immigration targets and the state government’s desire to keep Sydney ahead of other Australian cities as a global city. This population growth then drives important governance decisions at state and national levels, particularly relating to development. By prioritising rapid dwelling construction to accommodate Sydney’s rising population, but lacking adequate funding for new transport, the state government has had to reduce checks and balances needed for more democratic planning and sustainable development.

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Dr Tabe Bergman – Reflecting on Responsibility, Intent and Conformism Among Journalists

Dr Tabe Bergman – Reflecting on Responsibility, Intent and Conformism Among Journalists

Herman and Chomsky’s propaganda model is among the most renowned academic contributions to the study of journalism. Although it offers valuable insight into news content and how the media industry operates, it mostly ignores an important step in the production of news: what happens in the newsroom. Dr Tabe Bergman, an Assistant Professor at Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University and Deputy Head of the University’s Media and Communication department, recently assessed practices in the newsroom, with the aim to supplement the propaganda model.

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Dr Edward Andrew – Critical Reflections on The Theology of Liberalism

Dr Edward Andrew – Critical Reflections on The Theology of Liberalism

Dr Eric Nelson, a political theorist and Professor of Government at Harvard University, recently published a book entitled ‘The Theology of Liberalism: Political Philosophy and the Justice of God’. In this book, Nelson argues that liberal traditions in politics are ultimately a product of ancient theological disputes about freedom of the will. Dr Edward Andrew, a Professor Emeritus at University of Toronto, recently published a paper that questions some of the ideas introduced by Nelson in his recent work. His paper highlights the failure of Nelson’s ideas to reconcile differences between Christians and Jews or provide for religious toleration. Andrew also suggests that a liberalism based on utility rather than individual rights, or what Nelson calls ‘dignitarian liberalism’, would be less likely to generate social inequities.

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The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

Humanity is facing many challenges, ranging from COVID-19 to climate change, and from natural resource depletion to social inequity. The Prince Mahidol Award Conference is an annual event held in Bangkok, where leaders and experts meet to discuss global challenges. This year, the theme was ‘The World We Want: Actions Towards a Sustainable, Fairer and Healthier Society’.

read more
Professor John P Miller | The Importance of Compassion and Compromise in Healthy Societies

Professor John P Miller | The Importance of Compassion and Compromise in Healthy Societies

In a recent paper, Professor John P Miller discusses the importance of mutual accommodation and compassion in preserving democracies and ensuring we can tackle some of our biggest global problems. He highlights the way in which Canada has become a more tolerant, cooperative, inclusive society by emphasising the role of compromise and compassion. Using examples from education, he shows how we can nurture these qualities in children and young adults.

read more
Dr Hong Lu | Exploring the Impact of the Death Penalty on a Convict’s Family

Dr Hong Lu | Exploring the Impact of the Death Penalty on a Convict’s Family

So far, very few research studies have investigated the effects of criminal convictions on the families of defendants. Dr Hong Lu, a Professor of Criminal Justice at University of Nevada, along with her co-authors, Dr Yudu Li and Dr Bin Liang, carried out a study examining how the family of Nian Bin, the defendant in a high-profile capital case in China who received four death sentences, managed the physical, emotional, financial, and legal challenges they faced after their relative’s conviction.

read more
Dr Megan Schraedley | Reducing Political Sectarianism to Introduce Important Legislation

Dr Megan Schraedley | Reducing Political Sectarianism to Introduce Important Legislation

In the United States, public opinions have become increasingly polarised. This polarisation leads to ‘othering’, which describes how one group of people can view another group as very different from themselves and depict them in negative ways. Dr Megan Schraedley at West Chester University recently carried out a study exploring how othering arises in the context of US politics, and how it can be disrupted. Understanding how this destructive phenomenon can be disrupted could help policymakers to successfully introduce important legislation.

read more
Dr Robert L. Walsh | Propaganda and Mass Deception Depend Upon the Tribal Mind

Dr Robert L. Walsh | Propaganda and Mass Deception Depend Upon the Tribal Mind

Propaganda is the systemic use of language with the intent to brainwash rather than to persuade. It has the subtle but pervasive power to ensnare an entire populace toward a predetermined attitude or outlook. Deceptive communication is now commonplace in this information age. Dr Robert L. Walsh recently examined how propagandists bend language for mass deception. He argued that what makes propaganda so insidious is a vestige of our prehistoric past – the Neolithic or Tribal mind.

read more
Dr Andrea Binsfeld | Exploring Narratives of Slavery in Ancient Novels and Political Texts

Dr Andrea Binsfeld | Exploring Narratives of Slavery in Ancient Novels and Political Texts

The perspectives and characteristics of specific historical periods are often reflected in the literary texts produced and circulated at the time. Dr Andrea Binsfeld, an Associate Professor at University of Luxembourg, has conducted several studies examining narratives of slavery in ancient texts, including novels and political discourses. Her analyses outline, from a different perspective, the deep impact that the institution of slavery had in Greek and Roman societies.

read more
Professor Kieran Kilcawley | Using Flavour Chemistry to Identify Biomarkers Behind the Sensory Perception of Irish Grass-fed Beef and Lamb

Professor Kieran Kilcawley | Using Flavour Chemistry to Identify Biomarkers Behind the Sensory Perception of Irish Grass-fed Beef and Lamb

For many consumers, the origin of the food they buy is of great importance. For instance, Irish beef and lamb is often seen as superior quality meat, as the animals are typically reared outdoors on a diet of predominately fresh grass. However, are Irish beef and lamb actually any different to meats produced elsewhere, from animals reared indoors in less sustainable production systems? Professor Kieran Kilcawley and his team at the Teagasc Agriculture and Food Development Authority in Ireland, in conjunction with University College Dublin, are investigating the ‘flavour chemistry’ of beef and lamb. Their aim is to determine whether there are fundamental differences in the chemical properties of meat due to the animal’s diet and origin.

read more
Dr William Durkan | Exploring How the Geography of Voter Turnout Impacts Election Results

Dr William Durkan | Exploring How the Geography of Voter Turnout Impacts Election Results

Voter turnout plays a key role in the functioning of democracies. If only a minority of citizens vote, the elected government might not accurately represent the views of the population. In contrast, when voter turnout is high, a country’s government has a strong mandate to make decisions on its citizens’ behalf. The geographical distributions of voters and voter turnout also significantly affect the outcome of elections. Dr William Durkan of Maynooth University in Ireland recently explored the changing geographies of voter turnout in US presidential elections from 2012 to 2020, using the state of Michigan as a case study.

read more
John H Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

John H Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

Technology has opened up new possibilities in the world of literature, by enabling the dissemination of artistic texts through digital media, and even by creating language-based art. John Cayley, Professor of Literary Arts at Brown University, was a pioneer of language-based digital art. Since the beginning of personal computing, he has been experimenting with the use of computer programs and algorithms to create poetry.

read more
Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

In recent decades, the population of urban areas worldwide has been growing exponentially. This includes Sydney, where 5 million inhabitants currently reside. Associate Professor Glen Searle at the University of Sydney recently explored how Sydney’s population growth is encouraged by national and state governments, and how it also drives important government decisions.

read more
The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

Humanity is facing many challenges, ranging from COVID-19 to climate change, and from natural resource depletion to social inequity. The Prince Mahidol Award Conference is an annual event held in Bangkok, where leaders and experts meet to discuss global challenges. This year, the theme was ‘The World We Want: Actions Towards a Sustainable, Fairer and Healthier Society’.

read more
Professor Kieran Kilcawley | Using Flavour Chemistry to Identify Biomarkers Behind the Sensory Perception of Irish Grass-fed Beef and Lamb

Professor Kieran Kilcawley | Using Flavour Chemistry to Identify Biomarkers Behind the Sensory Perception of Irish Grass-fed Beef and Lamb

For many consumers, the origin of the food they buy is of great importance. For instance, Irish beef and lamb is often seen as superior quality meat, as the animals are typically reared outdoors on a diet of predominately fresh grass. However, are Irish beef and lamb actually any different to meats produced elsewhere, from animals reared indoors in less sustainable production systems? Professor Kieran Kilcawley and his team at the Teagasc Agriculture and Food Development Authority in Ireland, in conjunction with University College Dublin, are investigating the ‘flavour chemistry’ of beef and lamb. Their aim is to determine whether there are fundamental differences in the chemical properties of meat due to the animal’s diet and origin.

read more
Dr William Durkan | Exploring How the Geography of Voter Turnout Impacts Election Results

Dr William Durkan | Exploring How the Geography of Voter Turnout Impacts Election Results

Voter turnout plays a key role in the functioning of democracies. If only a minority of citizens vote, the elected government might not accurately represent the views of the population. In contrast, when voter turnout is high, a country’s government has a strong mandate to make decisions on its citizens’ behalf. The geographical distributions of voters and voter turnout also significantly affect the outcome of elections. Dr William Durkan of Maynooth University in Ireland recently explored the changing geographies of voter turnout in US presidential elections from 2012 to 2020, using the state of Michigan as a case study.

read more
John H Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

John H Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

Technology has opened up new possibilities in the world of literature, by enabling the dissemination of artistic texts through digital media, and even by creating language-based art. John Cayley, Professor of Literary Arts at Brown University, was a pioneer of language-based digital art. Since the beginning of personal computing, he has been experimenting with the use of computer programs and algorithms to create poetry.

read more
Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

In recent decades, the population of urban areas worldwide has been growing exponentially. This includes Sydney, where 5 million inhabitants currently reside. Associate Professor Glen Searle at the University of Sydney recently explored how Sydney’s population growth is encouraged by national and state governments, and how it also drives important government decisions.

read more
The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

Humanity is facing many challenges, ranging from COVID-19 to climate change, and from natural resource depletion to social inequity. The Prince Mahidol Award Conference is an annual event held in Bangkok, where leaders and experts meet to discuss global challenges. This year, the theme was ‘The World We Want: Actions Towards a Sustainable, Fairer and Healthier Society’.

read more

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