Arts and Humanities

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Dr Andrea Binsfeld | Exploring Narratives of Slavery in Ancient Novels and Political Texts

Dr Andrea Binsfeld | Exploring Narratives of Slavery in Ancient Novels and Political Texts

The perspectives and characteristics of specific historical periods are often reflected in the literary texts produced and circulated at the time. Dr Andrea Binsfeld, an Associate Professor at University of Luxembourg, has conducted several studies examining narratives of slavery in ancient texts, including novels and political discourses. Her analyses outline, from a different perspective, the deep impact that the institution of slavery had in Greek and Roman societies.

read more
Dr Jens Allwood | Exploring the Dark, Dystopic Side of Digitalisation

Dr Jens Allwood | Exploring the Dark, Dystopic Side of Digitalisation

Over recent decades, the use of digital technologies has increased exponentially worldwide, bringing significant changes to daily life. Like most societal transformations, this process of ‘digitalisation’ has had both positive and negative aspects. Dr Jens Allwood, Professor Emeritus at the University of Gothenburg, has recently published a paper exploring some of the darker elements of digitalisation, particularly focusing on its tendency to dehumanise our daily activities.

read more
Professor John Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

Professor John Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

The term literature refers to a wide and diverse range of work, including novels, poems, plays, and essays. While literary experts agree that all literature is composed of language, they often argue about which texts can or should be considered as a part of the literature that we value. In recent years, technological advances have led to the creation of innovative works that merge language with digital media, state-of-the-art technologies and computation itself. In a fascinating book called Grammalepsy, Professor John Cayley of Brown University introduces a new theory of aesthetic linguistic practice that could shed new light on digital literature or, more comprehensively, language art.

read more
Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

Rises in population and demographic changes can have significant effects on the development and governance of urban environments. Associate Professor Glen Searle of the University of Sydney recently published a paper that highlights the ways in which Sydney’s rapid population growth is supported by national immigration targets and the state government’s desire to keep Sydney ahead of other Australian cities as a global city. This population growth then drives important governance decisions at state and national levels, particularly relating to development. By prioritising rapid dwelling construction to accommodate Sydney’s rising population, but lacking adequate funding for new transport, the state government has had to reduce checks and balances needed for more democratic planning and sustainable development.

read more
Dr Tabe Bergman – Reflecting on Responsibility, Intent and Conformism Among Journalists

Dr Tabe Bergman – Reflecting on Responsibility, Intent and Conformism Among Journalists

Herman and Chomsky’s propaganda model is among the most renowned academic contributions to the study of journalism. Although it offers valuable insight into news content and how the media industry operates, it mostly ignores an important step in the production of news: what happens in the newsroom. Dr Tabe Bergman, an Assistant Professor at Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University and Deputy Head of the University’s Media and Communication department, recently assessed practices in the newsroom, with the aim to supplement the propaganda model.

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Dr Edward Andrew – Critical Reflections on The Theology of Liberalism

Dr Edward Andrew – Critical Reflections on The Theology of Liberalism

Dr Eric Nelson, a political theorist and Professor of Government at Harvard University, recently published a book entitled ‘The Theology of Liberalism: Political Philosophy and the Justice of God’. In this book, Nelson argues that liberal traditions in politics are ultimately a product of ancient theological disputes about freedom of the will. Dr Edward Andrew, a Professor Emeritus at University of Toronto, recently published a paper that questions some of the ideas introduced by Nelson in his recent work. His paper highlights the failure of Nelson’s ideas to reconcile differences between Christians and Jews or provide for religious toleration. Andrew also suggests that a liberalism based on utility rather than individual rights, or what Nelson calls ‘dignitarian liberalism’, would be less likely to generate social inequities.

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The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

Humanity is facing many challenges, ranging from COVID-19 to climate change, and from natural resource depletion to social inequity. The Prince Mahidol Award Conference is an annual event held in Bangkok, where leaders and experts meet to discuss global challenges. This year, the theme was ‘The World We Want: Actions Towards a Sustainable, Fairer and Healthier Society’.

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Can Seasonal Work Schemes Be Socially Just? | Ruth McAreavey

Can Seasonal Work Schemes Be Socially Just? | Ruth McAreavey

Seasonal workers often fill temporary positions that are poorly paid and commonly deemed undesirable by residents. While seasonal work schemes can benefit both employers and the local economy, they often fuel the uneven economic participation and marginalisation of migrants. Professor Ruth McAreavey of Newcastle University recently published a paper outlining issues that should be addressed if seasonal worker schemes are to achieve social justice.

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Han Han and Fredrik Mørk Røkenes – Investigating The Benefits Of The ‘Flipped Classroom’ In Teacher Training

Han Han and Fredrik Mørk Røkenes – Investigating The Benefits Of The ‘Flipped Classroom’ In Teacher Training

The ‘flipped classroom’ is an innovative educational approach that emphasises active learning, with the aim of increasing student engagement and academic performance. While educators in numerous disciplines have recently started experimenting with this approach, there is still a lack of solid research assessing its effectiveness in the field of teacher education. To fill this gap, Han Han and Fredrik Mørk Røkenes of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have recently examined a multitude of studies focusing on flipped classroom approaches in teacher training environments.

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PMAC 2022: Moving Towards the World We Want

PMAC 2022: Moving Towards the World We Want

The Prince Mahidol Award Conference (PMAC) is an annual event held in Bangkok, at which humanitarian leaders and experts in various disciplines meet to discuss global challenges, including health crises and climate change. This year, the conference ran from the 25th to the 29th of January, featuring seven sessions with international speakers. The theme of PMAC 2022 was ‘The World We Want: Actions Towards a Sustainable, Fairer and Healthier Society’. This article highlights some of the main global issues and megatrends discussed at the conference.

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Exploring the Hershey Company’s Child Labour Case | Dr Bertrand Guillotin

Exploring the Hershey Company’s Child Labour Case | Dr Bertrand Guillotin

The Hershey Company, one of the largest chocolate manufacturers in the world, produces and distributes millions of sweet treats every year. In 2019, an article on the Washington Post accused the company of failing to uproot child labour from its cocoa supply chain. Dr Bertrand Guillotin, an Associate Professor at Temple University’s Fox School of Business, recently published a case study that closely explores these child labour allegations against the Hershey Company.

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Dr Andrea Binsfeld | Exploring Narratives of Slavery in Ancient Novels and Political Texts

Dr Andrea Binsfeld | Exploring Narratives of Slavery in Ancient Novels and Political Texts

The perspectives and characteristics of specific historical periods are often reflected in the literary texts produced and circulated at the time. Dr Andrea Binsfeld, an Associate Professor at University of Luxembourg, has conducted several studies examining narratives of slavery in ancient texts, including novels and political discourses. Her analyses outline, from a different perspective, the deep impact that the institution of slavery had in Greek and Roman societies.

read more
Dr Jens Allwood | Exploring the Dark, Dystopic Side of Digitalisation

Dr Jens Allwood | Exploring the Dark, Dystopic Side of Digitalisation

Over recent decades, the use of digital technologies has increased exponentially worldwide, bringing significant changes to daily life. Like most societal transformations, this process of ‘digitalisation’ has had both positive and negative aspects. Dr Jens Allwood, Professor Emeritus at the University of Gothenburg, has recently published a paper exploring some of the darker elements of digitalisation, particularly focusing on its tendency to dehumanise our daily activities.

read more
Professor John Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

Professor John Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

The term literature refers to a wide and diverse range of work, including novels, poems, plays, and essays. While literary experts agree that all literature is composed of language, they often argue about which texts can or should be considered as a part of the literature that we value. In recent years, technological advances have led to the creation of innovative works that merge language with digital media, state-of-the-art technologies and computation itself. In a fascinating book called Grammalepsy, Professor John Cayley of Brown University introduces a new theory of aesthetic linguistic practice that could shed new light on digital literature or, more comprehensively, language art.

read more
Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

Rises in population and demographic changes can have significant effects on the development and governance of urban environments. Associate Professor Glen Searle of the University of Sydney recently published a paper that highlights the ways in which Sydney’s rapid population growth is supported by national immigration targets and the state government’s desire to keep Sydney ahead of other Australian cities as a global city. This population growth then drives important governance decisions at state and national levels, particularly relating to development. By prioritising rapid dwelling construction to accommodate Sydney’s rising population, but lacking adequate funding for new transport, the state government has had to reduce checks and balances needed for more democratic planning and sustainable development.

read more
Dr Tabe Bergman – Reflecting on Responsibility, Intent and Conformism Among Journalists

Dr Tabe Bergman – Reflecting on Responsibility, Intent and Conformism Among Journalists

Herman and Chomsky’s propaganda model is among the most renowned academic contributions to the study of journalism. Although it offers valuable insight into news content and how the media industry operates, it mostly ignores an important step in the production of news: what happens in the newsroom. Dr Tabe Bergman, an Assistant Professor at Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University and Deputy Head of the University’s Media and Communication department, recently assessed practices in the newsroom, with the aim to supplement the propaganda model.

read more
John H Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

John H Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

Technology has opened up new possibilities in the world of literature, by enabling the dissemination of artistic texts through digital media, and even by creating language-based art. John Cayley, Professor of Literary Arts at Brown University, was a pioneer of language-based digital art. Since the beginning of personal computing, he has been experimenting with the use of computer programs and algorithms to create poetry.

read more
Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

In recent decades, the population of urban areas worldwide has been growing exponentially. This includes Sydney, where 5 million inhabitants currently reside. Associate Professor Glen Searle at the University of Sydney recently explored how Sydney’s population growth is encouraged by national and state governments, and how it also drives important government decisions.

read more
The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

Humanity is facing many challenges, ranging from COVID-19 to climate change, and from natural resource depletion to social inequity. The Prince Mahidol Award Conference is an annual event held in Bangkok, where leaders and experts meet to discuss global challenges. This year, the theme was ‘The World We Want: Actions Towards a Sustainable, Fairer and Healthier Society’.

read more
John H Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

John H Cayley | Grammalepsy: The Art of Language as Culture Goes Digital

Technology has opened up new possibilities in the world of literature, by enabling the dissemination of artistic texts through digital media, and even by creating language-based art. John Cayley, Professor of Literary Arts at Brown University, was a pioneer of language-based digital art. Since the beginning of personal computing, he has been experimenting with the use of computer programs and algorithms to create poetry.

read more
Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

Associate Professor Glen Searle | Exploring How Sydney’s Population Growth Impacts Its Governance

In recent decades, the population of urban areas worldwide has been growing exponentially. This includes Sydney, where 5 million inhabitants currently reside. Associate Professor Glen Searle at the University of Sydney recently explored how Sydney’s population growth is encouraged by national and state governments, and how it also drives important government decisions.

read more
The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

Humanity is facing many challenges, ranging from COVID-19 to climate change, and from natural resource depletion to social inequity. The Prince Mahidol Award Conference is an annual event held in Bangkok, where leaders and experts meet to discuss global challenges. This year, the theme was ‘The World We Want: Actions Towards a Sustainable, Fairer and Healthier Society’.

read more

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