An Absorbing Tale of the Intestine Unfolds – Andrew M. Freddo, Dr Katherine D. Walton, Professor Deborah L. Gumucio

Jun 29, 2018health and medicine

Understanding the mechanisms behind the development of the small intestine will help aid discovery of new therapies targeting intestinal disorders. Andrew Freddo and his colleagues at the University of Michigan Medical School are working to understand these life-threatening disorders that currently have limited treatment options.

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