A Rare Universe? The Multiverse Debate Through the Lens of Philosophy – Dr Simon Friederich, University of Groningen

Jul 20, 2018physical sciences

How did we get here? How could a universe with such simple physical laws have created something as complex as us? These questions are so fundamental that even after millennia, neither scientists nor philosophers have reached a universally satisfying answer. Dr Simon Friederich, a philosopher at the University of Groningen, focuses his attention on one particular suggested response to the mystery of our existence: that it can be explained by the hypothetical existence of many universes beyond our own. But like any worthy philosopher, he is aware of the limits of our ability to determine the truth in such fundamental matters.

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