Improved Drought Early Warning Science Helps Save Lives and Livelihoods in Africa – Climate Hazards Group, University of California Santa Barbara

Jun 22, 2018earth and environment

Bringing together multidisciplinary scientists and food security analysts from UC Santa Barbara, Africa and Central America, the Climate Hazards Group develops datasets, tools and forecasts that help guide effective disaster responses and long-term development plans in food insecure countries. Working closely with partners in the US Geological Survey, NASA, and the Famine Early Warning Systems Network, the team uses climate and hydrologic models, satellite-based earth observations, and socio-economic data sets to predict and monitor droughts and food shortages among the world’s most vulnerable populations, supporting critical planning and timely humanitarian assistance that save lives and livelihoods.

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