Working Together to Achieve a Better Future for the Horticultural Industry – Dr Lynda K Deeks, Dr Chantelle N Jay and Dr Laura H Vickers

Oct 5, 2018 | behavioural sciences, earth and environment, stem education

About this episode

The production of fresh fruit and vegetables, and ornamental plants, is often taken for granted. While producing horticultural crops and plants offers many societal benefits, it can also have negative impacts on the environment and even on crop production itself. Finding solutions that promote the benefits but reduce the impact of horticulture, through collaboration with industry and research organisations, has been the focus of Drs Lynda Deeks, Chantelle Jay and Laura Vickers, NERC Knowledge Exchange Fellowships.
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