The Geological History of Once-Glaciated Regions Affects Current and Future Earth Surface Processes | Dr Alison Anders

May 4, 2022 | earth and environment, trending

Original Article Reference

This SciPod is a summary of the paper ‘Impacts of Quaternary History on Critical Zone Structure and Processes: Examples and a Conceptual Model From the Intensively Managed Landscapes Critical Zone Observatory’, from Frontiers in Earth Science. doi.org/10.3389/feart.2018.00024

About this episode

Over the past few millions of years, a succession of ice ages has profoundly influenced the geology of Earth’s northerly latitudes. These past events continue to influence our lives today – particularly in the fertile regions we now rely on for agriculture. By tracing the advances and retreats of ice sheets, Dr Alison Anders at the University of Illinois is gaining important new insights into how the landscapes and ecosystems of these regions are intrinsically linked to the geological past. Her team is also revealing how these areas are responding to a changing climate, and to complex human relationships with the land.

 

 

 

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