The Effects of Autonomy on Motivation in Different Cultures – Dr Ritu Tripathi

Jun 30, 2020 | social and behavioural sciences

This SciPod is a summary of the paper ‘Are the Motivational Effects of Autonomy-Supportive Conditions Universal? Contrasting Results Among Indians and Americans’ published in the Sage journal Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin: DOI:10.1177/0146167218764663

About this episode

Social psychology is the scientific study of individuals in society. An immense body of work has demonstrated that social cues, such as the facial expressions and body language of others, affect our motivation. One line of research suggests that autonomy-supportive instructions enhance motivation. However, this work has primarily been conducted in Western contexts and relatively little has been established about the universality of such effects across different cultures. Dr Ritu Tripathi at the Indian Institute of Management Bangalore and her colleagues are working to overcome this knowledge gap, with important theoretical and methodological implications for the business world and beyond.

 

 

 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International LicenseCreative Commons License

What does this mean?

Share: You can copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt: You can change, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially.

Credit: You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made.

Related episodes

Dr Holly Keily | Exploring How Humans Describe Tasks Using Gestures

Dr Holly Keily | Exploring How Humans Describe Tasks Using Gestures

For decades, linguists and psychologists have been trying to understand the fascinating ways in which humans communicate with each other in different real-world settings. Overall, spoken communication involves a mixture of words, facial expressions, and gestures. Dr Holly Keily, a researcher at the University at Buffalo, has recently carried out a study specifically exploring how speakers explain events to partners who will need to identify them, particularly focusing on their use of gestures.

Dr Jens Allwood | Exploring the Dark, Dystopic Side of Digitalisation

Dr Jens Allwood | Exploring the Dark, Dystopic Side of Digitalisation

Over recent decades, the use of digital technologies has increased exponentially worldwide, bringing significant changes to daily life. Like most societal transformations, this process of ‘digitalisation’ has had both positive and negative aspects. Dr Jens Allwood, Professor Emeritus at the University of Gothenburg, has recently published a paper exploring some of the darker elements of digitalisation, particularly focusing on its tendency to dehumanise our daily activities.

Dr Brenton Fredericks – Improving Communication and Learning in South African Classrooms

Dr Brenton Fredericks – Improving Communication and Learning in South African Classrooms

The broad dissemination of information online has made students more inclined to question what they are being taught in the classroom. Many educators are thus trying to adapt their teaching strategies to ensure that new generations successfully acquire new skills and learn new knowledge. Dr Brenton Fredericks, Head of the Communication Sciences Department at Central University of Technology in South Africa, recently developed a framework that could improve communication between educators and students in the classroom, promoting more constructive and effective learning.

Discovery of Neurotrophic Factor-α1 Reveals New Treatment Strategies for Stress-induced Neurodegenerative Diseases and Depression | Dr Y. Peng Loh

Discovery of Neurotrophic Factor-α1 Reveals New Treatment Strategies for Stress-induced Neurodegenerative Diseases and Depression | Dr Y. Peng Loh

Stress produces numerous negative effects on the human body. Lying deep within the brain, one particularly sensitive area is the hippocampus, where chronic exposure to stress hormones can lead to the degeneration and death of neurons. Thankfully, the brain holds defence mechanisms that block some of these negative effects. Deciphering these mechanisms with the aim of better treating neurodegenerative diseases and depression is Dr Y. Peng Loh from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in the USA.

Increase the impact of your research

• Good science communication helps people make informed decisions and motivates them to take appropriate and affirmative action.
• Good science communication encourages everyday people to be scientifically literate so that they can analyse the integrity and legitimacy of information.
• Good science communication encourages people into STEM-related fields of study and employment.
• Good public science communication fosters a community around research that includes both members of the public, policymakers and scientists.
• In a recent survey, 75% of people suggested they would prefer to listen to an interesting story than read it.

Step 1 Upload your science paper

Step 2 SciPod script written

Step 3 Voice audio recorded

Step 4 SciPod published