The Benefits and Costs of Legalising Same-Sex Marriage in the USA | Dr Kristina B. Wolff

Feb 25, 2022 | social and behavioural sciences, trending

Original Article Reference

This SciPod is a summary of the paper ‘“I Do, I Don’t”: The benefits and Perils of Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage in the United States- One Year Later’, published in the open access journal Humanities. DOI: 10.3390/h6020012.

About this episode

On the 26th of June 2015, the US Supreme Court legalised same-sex marriage across the USA, allowing same-sex couples to be legally recognised as married in all 50 states. In a study conducted one year later, Dr Kristina B. Wolff at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice, explored some of the benefits and costs of this legalisation for LGBTQ+ communities living in the USA. She introduced a new framework, based on the work of economist Dr Amartya Sen and philosopher Dr Martha Nussbaum, that could encourage long-lasting positive social change.

 
 

 

 

 

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