Saving Primates We Need to Act Before It’s Too Late – Drs Alejandro Estrada and Paul A Garber

Nov 8, 2019 | earth and environment

 Original article reference:

‘Impending extinction crisis of the world’s primates: Why primates matter’, from Science Advances

https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1600946

About this episode

Nonhuman primates (prosimians, monkeys, and apes) are our closest biological relatives, and they offer critical insights into our evolution, biology and behaviour. Yet, unsustainable human activities are now the major force driving these animals to extinction. Primatologists Dr Alejandro Estrada and Dr Paul A. Garber, based at the National Autonomous University of Mexico and at the University of Illinois-Urbana, respectively want to bring attention to the multiple factors affecting the primate extinction crisis worldwide.
 

 

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