Revitalising Attention on the Global Asbestos Disaster – Dr Jukka Takala, et al.

Jun 12, 2020 | earth and environment, health and medicine, trending

Original Article Reference

This SciPod is a summary of the paper ‘Global Asbestos Disaster’, from the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15051000

About this episode

In developed countries, we are broadly aware of the dangers of asbestos and the risks it poses if discovered in our living or working environments. It may be shocking to learn that asbestos still causes an estimated 255,000 deaths annually worldwide, with the vast majority – 89% – from work-related exposure. Although asbestos is banned in 55 countries, it is still widely used in the developing world, and over two million tonnes are consumed annually, leading to what Dr Jukka Takala, President of the International Commission of Occupational Health, and an international team of authors describe as a global asbestos disaster.

 

 

 

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