Investigating Fructans to Understand How Plants Can Survive Harsh Environments | Dr José Ordaz-Ortiz

Mar 16, 2022 | biology, physical sciences

Original Article Reference

This SciPod is a summary of the paper ‘Localization and composition of Fructans in Stem and Rhizome of Agave Tequilana Weber var. azul’, in Frontiers in Plant Science. doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2020.608850

About this episode

The molecules within plant tissues can tell us about how they can withstand harsh environmental conditions. The Agave tequilana plant, native to Mexico, has a high concentration of fructan molecules throughout its tissues. Alongside his colleagues, Dr José Ordaz-Ortiz at the Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico, combines several powerful analytical techniques to better understand the role that these fructans play in plant biology.

 

 

 

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