Genetically Engineered Plants: A Potential Solution to Climate Change – Dr Charles DeLisi, Boston University

Sep 18, 2020 | biology, earth and environment

Original Article Reference

https://doi.org/10.33548/SCIENTIA500

About this episode

Climate change is already having devastating effects felt across the globe. Without adequate measures to counteract the human drivers behind climate change, these negative consequences are guaranteed to increase in severity in the coming decades. Esteemed biomedical scientist, Dr Charles DeLisi of Boston University, urges that a multi-disciplinary approach to mitigating climate change is vital. Using predictive modelling, he has demonstrated the potential power of genetically engineering plants to remove excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, thereby mitigating climate change.

 

 

 

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