From Machine Learning To Machine Understanding – Dr Yan M Yufik

Feb 28, 2020 | biology, engineering and tech, health and medicine, physical sciences

Original Article Reference

https://doi.org/10.33548/SCIENTIA465

About this episode

Despite dramatic advances in neuroscience and biology in the 20th and 21st centuries, our understanding of the brain remains very limited. Dr Yan M Yufik, Head at Virtual Structures Research Inc, USA, is a physicist and cognitive scientist who has spent over 20 years combining experimental findings and theoretical concepts in domains as diverse as neuroscience and thermodynamics to form a theory of the brain. His focus has been on elucidating the mechanisms underlying human understanding and applying the results to the design of machines that can not only learn but understand what they are learning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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