Dr Jacopo Di Russo – Understanding the Complexity of Epithelia

May 18, 2022 | health and medicine, trending

Original Article Reference

This SciPod is a summary of the paper ‘Mechanobiology of Epithelia From the Perspective of Extracellular Matrix Heterogeneity’, from Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology. DOI: https://doi.org/10.3389/fbioe.2020.596599.

About this episode

Epithelial tissue is a protective layer of cells bound together into thin sheets that coat the internal and external surfaces of major body organs. The largest is the epidermis – the outer layer of the skin. This sheet-like structure is integral to its function and is maintained by a complex scaffolding network called the extracellular matrix (ECM). Dr Jacopo Di Russo and his colleagues at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Clinical Research of the University Hospital of Aachen, Germany, have recently discussed the diverse nature of the ECM and its hugely unmet potential within bioengineering.

 

 

 

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