Do Maternal Influences on Birthweight Influence Future Cardiometabolic Risk? | Dr Gunn-Helen Moen

Feb 28, 2022 | health and medicine, trending

Original Article Reference

This SciPod is a summary of the paper ‘Mendelian randomization study of maternal influences on birthweight and future cardiometabolic risk in the HUNT cohort’, published in Nature Communications. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19257-z

About this episode

Adverse environmental factors in the mother’s womb and/or during the first years of life have traditionally been thought to be responsible for an increased risk of cardiometabolic disease for children later in life. Dr Gunn-Helen Moen [MO-en] at the University of Oslo in Norway and her collaborators used sophisticated statistical and genetic techniques to identify whether there is a causal effect of environmental factors that influence intrauterine growth on future cardiometabolic risk in the child. Their results were surprising but important.

 

 

 

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