An Arts-based Approach to Science Communication Training – Dr Daniel J. McGarvey and Sarah E. Faris

Apr 5, 2019 | arts and humanities, stem education

About this episode

Rapid growth in the number and diversity of digital media outlets is creating novel opportunities to increase public engagement with science. Dr Daniel J. McGarvey and Sarah E. Faris, working at Virginia Commonwealth University, have developed an interdisciplinary training program that teaches STEM graduate students to use digital media to effectively communicate scientific topics to general audiences.
 

 

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Increase the impact of your research

• Good science communication helps people make informed decisions and motivates them to take appropriate and affirmative action.

• Good science communication encourages everyday people to be scientifically literate so that they can analyse the integrity and legitimacy of information.

• Good science communication encourages people into STEM-related fields of study and employment.

• Good public science communication fosters a community around research that includes both members of the public, policymakers and scientists.

• In a recent survey, 75% of people suggested they would prefer to listen to an interesting story than read it.

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Upload your science paper

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