A World Of Clinical Possibilities – Dr Helen Fitton, Marinova

Jun 18, 2020 | biology, earth and environment

Original Article Reference

This is a summary of the paper ‘Therapies from Fucoidan: New Developments’, from Marine Drugs, an MDPI journal.
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md17100571

About this episode

Fucoidans, which occur naturally in seaweeds, have previously been shown to have a range of possible clinical applications. In a review study, Dr Helen Fitton and her team from the biotechnology company, Marinova, discuss the breadth and depth of new fucoidan research – from their potential use in cancer treatment, to their possible effects on microbiome. Finally, they cover new techniques for the measurement, production and delivery of fucoidans, which are supporting the transition from research to clinical application.

 

 

 

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