Understanding Hearing at the Cellular Level – Professor David Furness, Keele University

Dec 14, 2018 | health and medicine

About this episode

How do we hear and process sound? Professor David Furness at Keele University, UK, is endeavouring to answer this question. By utilising modern microscopical techniques, his team is visualising and identifying the proteins that enable us to convert sound into electrical signals in the hearing pathway.
 

 

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