The Shape of Rational Choices in Game Theory – Dr Tarun Sabarwal, University of Kansas

Nov 23, 2018 | arts and humanities, physical sciences

Original Article Reference

https://doi.org/10.26320/SCIENTIA212

About this episode

The choices we make in various situations have collective effects on the patterns of overall movement in conflict and cooperation. Dr Tarun Sabarwal at the University of Kansas is investigating the ways in which the overall pictures produced by these behaviours can be predicted through mathematical models of game theory.

 

 

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