The 2022 Prince Mahidol Award Conference: Building the World We Want

May 4, 2022 | arts and humanities, arts and humanities animated, health and medicine, health and medicine animated, research animated

About this episode

Humanity is facing many challenges, ranging from COVID-19 to climate change, and from natural resource depletion to social inequity. The Prince Mahidol Award Conference is an annual event held in Bangkok, where leaders and experts meet to discuss global challenges. This year, the theme was ‘The World We Want: Actions Towards a Sustainable, Fairer and Healthier Society’.

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