Statistical Methods for Small Data – Dr Rens van de Schoot, Utrecht University

Sep 28, 2018 | business and economy, engineering and tech, health and medicine, social and behavioural sciences

About this episode

Researchers are heavily reliant on statistical techniques that are based on large sample sizes. Therefore, attempts to gain useful information from small samples can often lead to biased, or incorrect conclusions. Dr Rens van de Schoot at Utrecht University has shown that the limitations associated with small samples sizes can be overcome by using an alternative method – Bayesian estimation – as an all-encompassing approach to quantitative research. However, this approach comes at a price: expert knowledge must be integrated into the statistical model.

 

 

 

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