Investigating the Effect of Vitamin C on the Evolution of Insecticide Resistance – Dr Barry Pittendrigh, Purdue University

Nov 24, 2021 | earth and environment, health and medicine, Purdue University, trending

Original Article Reference

This SciPod is a summary of the paper ‘Dietary antioxidant vitamin C influences the evolutionary path of insecticide resistance in Drosophila melanogaster’, published in the journal Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology. doi.org/10.1016/j.pestbp.2020.104631

About this episode

Dietary antioxidants, such as vitamin C, are known to reduce the negative effects of toxins in mammals by preventing cellular damage caused by reactive oxygen species. However, it is not known whether these antioxidants have a similar protective effect in insects. A team led by Dr Barry Pittendrigh at Purdue University have investigated the adaptive responses of fruit flies to insecticide exposure in the presence of vitamin C. Their work has exciting implications for reducing the threat of insecticide resistance in insect pests.

 

 

 

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