GANP An Immunoactive Protein with a Key Role in Tumourigenesis – Dr Yasuhiro Sakai and Dr Kazuhiko Kuwahara

Oct 25, 2021 | biology, health and medicine

About this episode

Investigating the role of an immune system protein, GANP, and its coding gene, ganp, Dr Yasuhiro Sakai and Dr Kazuhiko Kuwahara (Fujita Health University School of Medicine) have unveiled a potential role for this important protein in tumourigenesis. The scientists apply a multidisciplinary approach to identify potential therapeutic solutions to aid cancer prognosis, a collaboration that occurs in the emerging field of immunopathology. The researchers focus on the differential levels of GANP which appear to correlate with breast cancers (low GANP) and with lymphocytic cancers (high GANP).

 

 

 

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