Causality: A Fundamental Necessity or Part of the Problem?

Nov 26, 2021 | physical sciences, trending

Original Article Reference

This SciPod is a summary of the paper ‘Is Causality a Necessary Tool for Understanding Our Universe, or Is It a Part of the Problem?’, from Entropy. https://doi.org/10.3390/e23070886

 

About this episode

For thousands of years, the notion of a one-way flow of cause-and-effect has underpinned virtually every scientific theory. Yet Dr Martin Tamm at the University of Stockholm argues that this notion of ‘causality’ may be holding back our understanding of how the Universe really works. Through his research, he suggests an alternative approach, based around a mathematical construct named ‘probability space’. His ideas could ultimately lead to new solutions to problems that physicists have struggled with for decades.

 

 

 

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