AI and Data Mining for Smart Manufacturing – Dr Timothy Young, The University of Tennessee

Nov 20, 2020 | engineering and tech

Original Article Reference

This SciPod is a summary of the paper ‘AI and Data Mining for Smart Manufacturing’ https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-018-1614-y

About this episode

Big data is now central to the operation of many online companies, but until now, the wealth of information it provides has remained largely untapped by manufacturers. Dr Tim Young at the University of Tennessee believes that through data science, this information could be used to significantly streamline the operations of many manufacturing industries. His work provides the widely varied parties involved in these processes with important new insights into how they should handle their data, ultimately helping them to improve the efficiency of their operations.

 

 

 

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