Shaking Up the Physics of Vibration – Dr Wei-Chau Xie, University of Waterloo

Aug 18, 2018 | earth and environment, engineering and tech

About this episode

Nuclear power plants may be some of the most secure structures in our society, but when subjected to earthquakes, they have the potential to cause major disasters. Dr Wei-Chau Xie of the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, is now developing algorithms for testing computer models of these structures – analysing their properties as they are subjected to virtual seismic activity. His research has provided new insights into how nuclear power plants may be designed to withstand stresses resulting from earthquakes, protecting nearby populations.
 

 

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