Revealing How Table Tennis Could Be Transformed into a Popular Spectator Sport | Professor Ralf Schneider

Mar 8, 2022 | physical sciences

Original Article Reference

This SciPod is a summary of the paper ‘Statistical Analysis of Table-Tennis Ball Trajectories’, from Applied Sciences. doi.org/10.3390/app8122595

About this episode

Rapid-fire rallies of short, fast shots are a defining feature of professional table tennis – but for many audiences, the excitement of these matches isn’t easily conveyed on the TV screen. Using a combination of computer simulations and statistical analysis, Professor Ralf Schneider and his colleagues at the Institute of Physics of the University of Greifswald, Germany, explore how slight changes to the game’s equipment could slow matches down, and make them more interesting to viewers. Karl Lüskow, Marc Marschall and Stefan Kemnitz produced and optimised the simulation code, while Lars Lewerentz performed statistical analysis of the data.

 

 

 

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