How To Help Bumblebees Before The World Ends… With Dave Goulson

Apr 18, 2019 | Uncategorized

In this episode of SciPod Radio we talk with Dave Goulson about his research on bumblebees. We cover why they’re so important to our existence, how to get more involved with bees if your a keen gardener, and even how you can help if you’re not green-fingered or you don’t have a garden…

Resources mentioned:

Best garden flowers for bees: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/lifesci/goulsonlab/resources/flowers

For Dave’s new book click here: “The Garden Jungle: or Gardening to Save the Planet”

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• Good science communication encourages people into STEM-related fields of study and employment.
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International LicenseCreative Commons License

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Share: You can copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt: You can change, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially.

Credit: You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made.

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Increase the impact of your research

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• Good science communication encourages people into STEM-related fields of study and employment.
• Good public science communication fosters a community around research that includes both members of the public, policymakers and scientists.
• In a recent survey, 75% of people suggested they would prefer to listen to an interesting story than read it.

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Original Article Reference

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International LicenseCreative Commons License

What does this mean?

Share: You can copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt: You can change, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially.

Credit: You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made.

More episodes

Increase the impact of your research

• Good science communication helps people make informed decisions and motivates them to take appropriate and affirmative action.
• Good science communication encourages everyday people to be scientifically literate so that they can analyse the integrity and legitimacy of information.
• Good science communication encourages people into STEM-related fields of study and employment.
• Good public science communication fosters a community around research that includes both members of the public, policymakers and scientists.
• In a recent survey, 75% of people suggested they would prefer to listen to an interesting story than read it.

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