Understanding the Antioxidant Boom: Trend or Treatment? – Dr Andy Wai Kan Yeung, University of Hong Kong

Nov 5, 2019 | biology, health and medicine

Original Article Reference

This SciPod is a summary of the paper ‘Antioxidants: Scientific Literature Landscape Analysis’, published in Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, a Hindawi journal. https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/8278454

About this episode

Recent studies have suggested that dietary intake of antioxidants could reduce the risk of diseases including coronary heart disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease. These studies are based on a long history of research into antioxidants, stretching back to the 1950s. In a recent review, Dr Andy Wai Kan Yeung at the University of Hong Kong and his colleagues examine the growth of the recent scientific literature concerning antioxidants to better understand how the scientific focus on these potential therapeutic molecules has changed over time.

 

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