Combatting the Lionfish Invasion – Dr Mark Hixon and Lab, University of Hawaii

Nov 2, 2018 | biology, earth and environment

About this episode

Lionfish are predators that typically inhabit Pacific and Indian Ocean coral reefs. In areas where they have been introduced, they have become troublesome invaders. Populations have spread and grown in some regions to the extent that they are wreaking havoc on local marine ecosystems. Dr Mark Hixon and his team are working hard to combat the lionfish invasion.
 

 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International LicenseCreative Commons License

What does this mean?

Share: You can copy and redistribute the material in any medium

or format

Adapt: You can change, and build upon the material for any

purpose, even commercially.

Credit: You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the

license, and indicate if changes were made.

Related episodes

Dr Alejandro Estrada | The Importance of Indigenous Peoples in Safeguarding Earth’s Primates

Dr Alejandro Estrada | The Importance of Indigenous Peoples in Safeguarding Earth’s Primates

Non-human primates play crucial roles in sustaining natural ecosystems worldwide. However, approximately 68% of primate species are now at risk of extinction, mainly due to agriculture and the depletion of natural resources. Dr Alejandro Estrada at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Dr Paul A. Garber at the University of Illinois-Urbana, and a group of scientists from various parts of the world recently carried out a study to better understand the role that Indigenous Peoples play in the conservation of threatened primates.

Dr Panicos Shangaris | Optimising the Prenatal Treatment of Inherited Diseases

Dr Panicos Shangaris | Optimising the Prenatal Treatment of Inherited Diseases

The greatest challenge for ageing populations is that vaccines can be less protective for the elderly due to the age-related decline of the immune system. This means that improving the efficacy of vaccines in the ageing population is crucial to public health. Dr Lei Jin and colleagues from the University of Florida set out to develop a novel strategy to directly address this key issue.

Professor Olubukola Oluranti Babalola | Improving The Production of Cowpea, a Sustainable Superfood

Professor Olubukola Oluranti Babalola | Improving The Production of Cowpea, a Sustainable Superfood

Cowpea is an extremely versatile food crop. Packed with high-quality protein, it has become a staple legume in many households in Africa, where it is indigenous. Cowpea also cycles nutrients back into the soil, supporting sustainable farming and healthy ecological networks. However, the production of this sustainable crop faces many hurdles, including drought, pesticide use, and declining soil quality. In a recent review, Professor Olubukola Oluranti Babalola of North-West University in South Africa outlines the issues facing cowpea production and highlights potential solutions.

Dr Laura Tipton | Symbiotic Science through a Shared Language

Dr Laura Tipton | Symbiotic Science through a Shared Language

Many scientific concepts are applicable to multiple disciplines and across spatial scales, from the microscopic to the global. As such, scientists from different disciplines must communicate effectively – through a shared scientific language – for effective collaboration and scientific advancement. With this aim, Dr Laura Tipton of Chaminade University and her colleagues from the University of Hawai’i investigate the history of ecological terminology, in order to work towards building a common lexicon that bridges ecology and microbiome science.

Increase the impact of your research

• Good science communication helps people make informed decisions and motivates them to take appropriate and affirmative action.

• Good science communication encourages everyday people to be scientifically literate so that they can analyse the integrity and legitimacy of information.

• Good science communication encourages people into STEM-related fields of study and employment.

• Good public science communication fosters a community around research that includes both members of the public, policymakers and scientists.

• In a recent survey, 75% of people suggested they would prefer to listen to an interesting story than read it.

Step 1

Upload your science paper

Step 2

SciPod script written

Step 3

Voice audio recorded

Step 4

SciPod published